Alaska Car Rental - Ketchikan, Alaska

Bold Group Design - Marketing, Web Design, Graphic Design - Ketchikan, Alaska

Computer Headquarters - Networking, iPhone Repair, Internet Security - Ketchikan, Alaska

Alaska Pest Management - Ketchikan, Alaska

Tongass Federal Credit Union - Ketchikan, Alaska

Schmolck Mechanical Contractors - Ketchikan, Alaska

The Commons at Tongass Federal Credit Union- Ketchikan, Alaska

PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center - Ketchikan, Alaska

Greater Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce - Ketchikan, Alaska

Shop Local & Advertise Local with SitNews - Ketchikan, Alaska

arrowContact
arrowWebmail Letters
arrowNews Tips
arrowCopyright Info
arrowArchives

Quick News Search
arrowAlaska
arrowKetchikan
arrowSE Alaska

Columns - Articles
arrow Dave Kiffer
arrow Money Matters

Historical Ketchikan
arrowJune Allen
arrowDave Kiffer
arrowLouise B. Harrington

Sports
arrowKetchikan Links

Public Records
arrow FAA Accident Reports
arrow NTSB Accident Reports
arrow Court Calendar
arrow Recent Filings & Case Dispositions
arrow Court Records Search
arrow Sex Offender Reg.
arrow Public Notices
arrow Alaska Recall Alerts
arrow Recalls.gov
arrow AST Daily Dispatch
arrow KTN Police Reports
arrow Juneau Police Reports

Weather, Webcams
arrowToday's Forecast
arrowKTN Weather Data
arrowAK Weather Map
arrowAK Weathercams
arrowAK Earthquakes

 

SitNews - Stories In The News - Ketchikan, Alaska

Front Page Photo By RACHELLE SPEIGHTS

Murphy's Landing
Front Page Photo By RACHELLE SPEIGHTS ©2021
To have your photo(s) featured on the front page,
email your photo(s) to editor@sitnews.us

Ketchikan's Community Risk Level
Raised to HIGH
(MAY 04, 2021)

Ketchikan's Community Risk Level Raised to HIGH (MAY 04, 2021)

Ketchikan Vaccination Data

Amount of COVID Funding Spent in Alaska & State-by-state (Click here)

COVID-19 Vaccine Information for all Alaskans (Click here )

Alaska COVID-19 Daily Updates - Case Counts, etc.

All Alaska Health Mandates: COVID-19 Health Mandates, Office of the Governor

Ketchikan COVID-19 Daily Updates: Ketchikan Emergency Operations Center COVID-19 Dashboard, updates & alerts...

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Center for Disease Control (CDC) Situation Summary Updated Frequently

Ketchikan: Public Meetings
Ketchikan: Upcoming Events
Ketchikan: Announcements
Ketchikan: Classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS

arrowPublish
Your Ad

Click Here

Historical Ketchikan

arrowJune Allen
arrowDave Kiffer
arrowLouise B. Harrington

Ketchikan Weather

arrow Ketchikan's Forecast
arrow March Daily Records 2021
arrow Ketchikan Feb. 2021 Data
arrow Ketchikan Jan. 2021 Data
arrow Nat Weather Service KTN
arrow Ketchikan Tides & Currents
arrow Sunrise - Sunset Ketchikan

Search the News

arrow Ketchikan

arrow
Alaska

U.S. Congress 2019-2020: Bills that have passed the House & Senate and become Law

U.S. Congress 2019-2020: Bills Introduced

Ketchikan: Ketchikan Community Risk Level Raised to HIGH; Ketchikan High School Closed Through Friday, May 7th - The  Ketchikan Emergency Operations Center and Ketchikan School District have seen an increase in COVID-19 cases in the past couple of weeks, including an increase in community spread cases. There are 12 new cases reported in Ketchikan today, and 9 cases reported on Monday.  Seven of those cases were determined to be close contacts to a known positive case, three were attributed to community spread, three were determined to be related to recent travel, and eight of the cases remain under investigation.  In the past 10 days, there have been more than 10 positive cases attributed to staff or students of the Ketchikan High School.

Public Health and Ketchikan School District Nursing Staff will work with the positive cases to identify close contacts, and will reach out to anyone identified as a close contact and instruct them to quarantine and seek testing as appropriate.

Most of the risk indicators are currently trending up. With the increase in overall cases, the positivity rate (percent of positive cases compared to the amount of tests issued) is at 2.61 percent.  Five cases in the past seven days have been attributed to community transmission. In addition, a large percentage of the close contact and community spread cases were not in quarantine when they tested positive.  Because of these factors, the Ketchikan Emergency Operations Center is increasing the Ketchikan Community Risk Level to Level 3 – HIGH. - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021

Fish Factor: Alaska’s commercial fisheries division facing no FY22 budget cuts By LAINE WELCH - The budget for Alaska’s commercial fisheries division is facing no cuts for the upcoming fiscal year, assuming the current numbers make it through the Legislature. 

“The governor's proposed budget is at about $72.8 million, which is a slight increase from the FY21 approved budget. And most of that increase is due to our personnel services, cost of living increases and things like that that are funded by the administration generally. And also from some additional federal funds for training and things like that. So we're looking pretty good compared to past years,” said Sam Rabung, director of the commercial fisheries division, the largest within the Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, which employs just over 640 full, part-time and seasonal workers.

 “We're really relieved because we've been cut pretty close to the bone and any additional significant cuts would impact fisheries directly. We wouldn't be able to do some of the assessment projects required for management and we would have to either close or severely restrict fisheries. And I think everybody understands that,” he said, adding that another bonus will be the reopening of the ADF&G office at Wrangell.

Rabung credited the Dunleavy Administration for taking the time to dig into the details that clearly show Alaska’s fisheries “pay their own way.”

“We’re absolutely encouraged by that,” he said. “There's been a lot of administrations that come in without knowing that the commercial fishing industry pays more into the general fund than we get out as a division to manage it. And because we don't advertise that, it doesn't get talked about much. But commercial fisheries as an industry pays more into the general fund and includes other things like licenses, fees, taxes, assessments, all those things add up to significantly more than we are allocated out of the general fund.”

Rabung added that most Alaskans don’t know that the commercial fisheries division also manages subsistence and personal use fisheries, along with several fisheries in federal waters, such as crab. And because fish are migratory and cross jurisdictional boundaries, staff also are involved in research and policy making activities of the Pacific Salmon Commission, the Joint Canadian/US Yukon River Panel and several other interstate and international fisheries bodies.

Southwest AK Covid survey:

How helpful have Covid relief programs been so far to people in Alaska’s vast Southwest region? A short survey aims to find out.

“We really wanted to focus on individual’s experiences, we’re not sending out to local governments, tribal governments, large organizations, things like that. We want to hear what the impacts or results of the Coronavirus was to you personally and to your family,” said Shirley Marquardt, executive director of the Southwest Alaska Municipal Conference (SWAMC) that since 1988 has represented over 45 communities from Kodiak to the Bristol Bay region, the Alaska Peninsula out to Adak, the Pribilof Islands and everywhere in between.

“We want to learn how helpful or accessible were federal, state, local, tribal grants or loan programs, because each community in our region has a different experience, and it's really vitally important that we get a handle on what those were,” she said. 

One goal is to create a sort of roadmap to better understand the unique characteristics of an economic disaster in each community and region.

“The second would be how SWAMC can better understand the grants or loan programs, or utility payments for municipalities that were most helpful,” Marquardt explained. “A lot of money went out that wasn't accessible to a lot of folks in our region because we have such limited broadband. And you could only apply online. We want to get a better handle and understanding of how that impacted folks and how to better understand the eligibility requirements and the application process.” - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021


Gateway City Realty - Ketchikan, Alaska Coastal Real Estate Group - Ketchikan, Alaska Legacy Real Estate - Ketchikan, Alaska EST 1970

Northwest: Newly identified saber-toothed cat is one of largest in history - A giant saber-toothed cat lived in the Pacific Northwest between 5 million and 9 million years ago, weighing up to 900 pounds and hunting prey that likely weighed 1,000 to 2,000 pounds, scientists reported yesterday in a new study.

The researchers completed a painstaking comparison of seven uncategorized fossil specimens with previously identified fossils and bone samples from around the world to describe the new species. Their finding makes a case for the use of the elbow portion of the humerus - in addition to teeth - to identify fossils of large saber-toothed cats whose massive forearms enabled them to subdue their prey. 

The newly identified cat weighed an average of around 600 or so pounds and could have managed to kill prey weighing up to 6,000 pounds, the scientists estimate, suggesting that their findings provide evidence for another giant cat, one of the largest in Earth history. 

"We believe these were animals that were routinely taking down bison-sized animals," said study co-author Jonathan Calede, an assistant professor of evolution, ecology and organismal biology at The Ohio State University's Marion campus. "This was by far the largest cat alive at that time."A giant saber-toothed cat lived in North America between 5 million and 9 million years ago, weighing up to 900 pounds and hunting prey that likely weighed 1,000 to 2,000 pounds, scientists reported today in a new study.

The researchers completed a painstaking comparison of seven uncategorized fossil specimens with previously identified fossils and bone samples from around the world to describe the new species. Their finding makes a case for the use of the elbow portion of the humerus - in addition to teeth - to identify fossils of large saber-toothed cats whose massive forearms enabled them to subdue their prey. 

The newly identified cat weighed an average of around 600 or so pounds and could have managed to kill prey weighing up to 6,000 pounds, the scientists estimate, suggesting that their findings provide evidence for another giant cat, one of the largest in Earth history. 

"We believe these were animals that were routinely taking down bison-sized animals," said study co-author Jonathan Calede, an assistant professor of evolution, ecology and organismal biology at The Ohio State University's Marion campus. "This was by far the largest cat alive at that time."- More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021

Southeast Alaska: Sitka Sound Herring Fishery Fourth Largest Since 1970 - The Alaska Department of Fish and Game mapped 102.3 nautical miles of herring spawn in 2021 from April 4 through April 19. This was one of the highest estimates of herring spawn mileage on record and was higher than the 20-year (2011–2020) average of 60.6 nmi and the 40-year (1981–2020) average of 59.1 nautical miles (nmi).

Aerial surveys of the Sitka Sound area began on March 9 to document herring activity and spawn and ended on April 17. After several days of spot spawn observations, major herring spawning began on April 4 when 6.5 nmi of active herring spawn was observed along the Kruzof Island shoreline, near Kresta Point, and on Crow and Gagarin Islands. Active herring spawn peaked on April 7, when 28.3 nmi of herring spawn was observed. It should be noted the department was unable to conduct aerial surveys on April 8 and 13 due to inclement weather. The last day active spawn was observed was April 17. Surveys from skiffs were conducted April 14–16 and April 19 to identify areas of shoreline that received herring spawn not observed during the aerial surveys.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced they successfully conducted spawn deposition surveys and sampled herring for age and size composition. Spawn deposition dive surveys were conducted April 17–21. Observed egg deposition was very high throughout the survey area. Preliminary results indicated the spawn deposition along the Kruzof Island shoreline was again exceptional due to high egg density coupled with a wide spawning area. Herring were sampled throughout the spawning period to determine age and size composition of the spawning stock and will be analyzed in coming months. Final results from this year’s stock assessment and the 2022 forecast will not be available until late 2021. - More....
May 04, 2021


Tongass Trading Company - Shop A Piece of History - Ketchikan, Alaska Tongass Trading Co. Furniture House - Ketchikan, Alaska PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center - Ketchikan, Alaska

New imaging equipment increases same-day access and evaluation of heart problems

New imaging equipment increases same-day access and evaluation of heart problems
Richard Butterfield and Nuclear Medicine Gamma Camera
Photo courtesy PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center


 

Ketchikan: New imaging equipment increases same-day access and evaluation of heart problems - A new nuclear medicine gamma camera and new echocardiogram services in the imaging department at PeaceHealth Ketchikan will greatly improve the opportunity for patients to have comprehensive heart assessments without leaving Southeast Alaska.

The new gamma camera is used in stress tests to assess coronary artery disease. It cuts the imaging time in half, with even better resolution. PHMG Medical Director Peter Rice MD, notes that nuclear imaging increases the accuracy from about 70% to roughly 90% in studies of men undergoing the exercise stress tests.

The new gamma camera has been in place about four months.

“We are now able to do stress echocardiograms,” said Dr. Rice. “This is an additional cardiac evaluation, not previously available in Ketchikan.”

The new echocardiogram system was added to Imaging about nine months ago. Cardiac sonographer Colin McCormick was recruited to join PeaceHealth Ketchikan for more timely access to the new equipment that also increases testing accuracy and provides faster results.

Colin McCormick has experience in both pediatric and stress echo sonography. Historically, children who need these tests had to travel off island for this service. Scott Smith, Director of Support Services, said, “previously we had a pediatric cardiologist travel to Ketchikan twice per year but now we can do these at patient and family convenience.

Smith said, "We will also increase access to this service by taking this equipment to the Prince of Wales clinic at an increased frequency to offer echocardiograms.” - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021

jpg video

Ketchikan: PeaceHealth announces Mission and Values Award recipients - PeaceHealth recently unveiled its systemwide Mission and Values Award recipients. The annual awards recognize inspiring employees (who PeaceHealth refers to as “caregivers”) who are living PeaceHealth’s Mission and Values of Social Justice, Stewardship, Respect and Collaboration, every day.

PeaceHealth Ketchikan physical therapist lead Catherine Addington was selected as one of five people across PeaceHealth's system for a Mission and Values award. She is the recipient of the Social Justice Award for her work helping people get fitted for the correct wheelchair. The award recognized Addington’s efforts identifying the need local patients had for accessible technology and the difficulties they had acquiring that technology in Ketchikan. Despite the hurdles of bringing a wheelchair program to an island in Alaska, Addington pursued the project and has since facilitated outfitting numerous patients in wheelchairs enhancing their mobility and quality of life.

This is a particularly special award to be received by a caregiver in Ketchikan. PeaceHealth employs over 16,000 caregivers in Oregon, Washington and Alaska. Both being nominated and receiving the award is an honor for a Ketchikan-based caregiver. The last system-wide Mission & Values award presented to a caregiver in Ketchikan was awarded to Ashley Hackert in 2018.- More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021


‘Tongass Odyssey’ explores decades of research, politics and change

‘Tongass Odyssey’ explores decades of research, politics and change
By MARY CATHARINE MARTIN
Biologist John Schoen with the Super Cub on a beach on Admiralty Island. The two antennas under each wing were used to determine which direction had the strongest signal from radio-collared animals. They then could locate the animals within an area about the size of an acre.
Photo by John Schoen ©


 

Southeast Alaska: ‘Tongass Odyssey’ explores decades of research, politics and change By MARY CATHARINE MARTIN - In 1977, John Schoen flew to Hood Bay on Admiralty Island. He’d been hired as the first Southeast Alaska research biologist to study deer and this was his first trip into the field.

“Flying into the bay, looking at humpback whales and all the bald eagles in the trees… we got out of the Beaver, stepped on the beach and saw these huge, enormous brown bear tracks. And listening to the blue grouse, and the geese on the beach, I just thought ‘Man, I’m getting paid to do this? Unbelievable!’” he recalled.

Forty-four years later, he’s made a career studying and working to conserve deer, mountain goats, brown bears, and Alaska’s ecosystems, and he’s written a book about the journey: “Tongass Odyssey: Seeing the Forest Ecosystem through the Politics of Trees; A Biologist’s Memoir.”

“What we learned is that old growth forest is very important,” he said of research he did with U.S. Forest Service research biologist Charlie Wallmo and fellow Alaska Department of Fish & Game research biologist Matt Kirchhoff. “Clearcuts were used by deer in the summertime, when there was an abundance of food, but in the winter time, when the snows came, the deer couldn’t use them. In the second growth, the deer would have to pack a lunch to make it through. There’s just nothing on the forest floor.

“One thing led to another. We published our results, and then we took tremendous flak from the Forest Service and the timber industry. I quickly realized that the science was hard to do without bumping into the politics.”

At times, that politics seemed to threaten his job. Twice in the 1980s, he was invited to testify before Congress about his research. Though his immediate supervisors and the then Deputy ADF&G Commissioner were supportive of his work, higher ups in state government were not. The State of Alaska first told Congress he was unavailable — then that there was no money to send him. That wasn’t true. He felt strongly enough about his duty to share what he had learned with the American public that he took annual leave to go testify each time, even taking out a loan to be able to afford the plane ticket.

“I just said, you know, if they don’t want me to go back that much and I have done this work on behalf of the public — it’s a public resource — I have to go back (to D.C.). It’s my responsibility,” he said.

As he branched out into researching brown bears and mountain goats and as his knowledge deepened, he began thinking about old growth forest a different way. - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021


Grizzly Family: A Conversation with Jerry and Caleb Jacques

Grizzly Family: A Conversation with Jerry and Caleb Jacques
By BJORN DIHLE
Cross species viewing with Grizzly Safaris.
Photo courtesy of Grizzly Safaris.


 

 

Alaska: Grizzly Family: A Conversation with Jerry and Caleb Jacques By BJORN DIHLE - When Jerry Jacques was 17, he ran away from California and hitchhiked to Alaska. He had heard stories of his great-grandfather and grandfather prospecting, trapping and living in the far north and intended to follow in their footsteps. He spent the summer in Talkeetna guiding raft trips but, that fall, since he was still a minor, the state troopers sent him back to California. A year later, after graduating from high school, Jerry was back in Alaska. His dream was to guide rivers in the summer and photograph wildlife in the winter. He had heard his grandfather had built a cabin near the headwaters of the Iliamna River, so he got together a light kit and hired a pilot to fly him in to spend the winter in the wilderness.

“I damn near starved to death that winter. I made so many mistakes,” Jerry said.

Today, Jerry and his family own and operate Grizzly Safaris, based out of Jacques Adventure Lodge in the village of Iliamna. They specialize in guiding photographers after the region’s incredible population of brown bears. Going from a teenager nearly starving to death in the wilds to having a successful ecotourism business has been a long, interesting and lucky journey for Jerry. After surviving that first winter, Jerry was in a desperate state. The river broke up in May and, not long after, a Dena’ina man named Kevin Jensen appeared outside the cabin. Kevin had taken his boat as far up the Iliamna River as he could, seen the smoke from Jerry’s cabin and gone to investigate. Kevin promptly took Jerry home to Pedro Bay, a village on the eastern edge of Lake Iliamna where Kevin and his family lived.

“Kevin brought me in to his parents’ home and said, ‘I found a stray gussak. Can we keep him?’ The Jensen family saved me, brought me in and taught me everything I know. I was so lucky to be brought in and taught the Native way,” Jerry said.

The Jensen’s ancestors had lived in Iliamna Lake country since time immemorial. Carl Jensen, Kevin’s dad, suggested that Jerry join him in guiding sport hunters after the regions’ brown bears and Dall sheep. There was good money in it, and Jerry’s dream of being a wildlife photographer hadn’t penciled out, so he signed on. Carl was a man of many trades. Besides being a hunting guide, he fished Bristol Bay during the sail-boat era, worked as a mechanic and ran the Pedro Bay post office with his wife Marjorie. Shortly before Carl passed on in 2016 at age 87, he was awarded Elder of the Year by the Bristol Bay Native Corporation.

Guiding hunters was lucrative but, after a while, Jerry couldn’t stomach it.

“I have no problem with hunting if the animal is being fully utilized, but I found myself rooting for the bears and not my hunters. I just got tired of seeing bears die. I shut down my business and didn’t know what I was going to do next,” Jerry said.

One thing that Jerry did know was that the Bristol Bay watershed—between the incredible runs of salmon, population of brown bear and other wildlife - is one of most incredible ecologically spectacular places on Earth.

“I’ve traveled all over. Nothing compares,” Jerry said.

In the early 2000s, Jerry called up renowned wildlife photographer Art Wolfe to see if he was interested in coming out to photograph bears. There was not much of a market for bear viewing back then, but Jerry and Art hit it off. Soon other photographers began booking trips. Today, bear photo trips amount for 95% of Grizzly Safari’s business, with catch and release sport fishing making up the remainder. They specialize in flying small groups from their lodge to a variety of locations in Katmai National Park and the nearby wilderness. Around 90% of their clients are repeat customers. - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021



 
Columns
Commentary

jpg BEN EDWARDS

FINANCIAL FOCUS: More relief in sight for business owners Provided By BEN EDWARDS, AAMS® - If you own a business that’s been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, you may have received some type of aid from the government – or maybe not. But in either case, some new opportunities for assistance may interest you.

President Biden signed legislation extending the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) application deadline from March 31 to May 31, 2021. So, if you haven’t received a PPP loan yet – or even if you have, and you’re eligible for a “second draw” loan – you’ve got another chance.

As you may know, a PPP loan may be fully forgiven, including interest, if the loan proceeds are used for eligible expenses such as payroll costs (including benefits), mortgage interest, rent, utilities, operations expenditures, property damage costs, supplier costs and work protection expenditures.

The recently enacted American Rescue Plan Act (ARP) also strengthens the PPP, providing $7.25 billion more in aid and expanding eligibility to some nonprofit organizations and local digital news services. And other recent changes to the PPP program were designed specifically to help smaller businesses.

Apart from these PPP benefits, the ARP includes other components that can help business owners, including the following: - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021

JOHN L. MICEK: IN SPEECH TO CONGRESS, BIDEN BETS ON DEMOCRACY - During his anything-but-typical address to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday night, President Joe Biden used the word “democracy,” over and over again.

Some were run-of-the-mill evocations, as was the case when he spoke of “revitalizing” our democracy – a promise made by more than one more president, and a bromide meant to soothe the nation’s soul. Others were more grave, as when he spoke of the Jan. 6 sacking of the U.S. Capitol, calling it “the worst attack on our democracy since the Civil War.

But one mention of democracy in Biden’s prime-time address really stood out. It came toward the end, as he spoke of the challenges facing the country as it stares down geopolitical allies who are hoping for our failure as a nation. But he could just as well have been speaking of the forces at home who similarly are hoping for his administration to fail, abetted by the aspiring autocrat in exile in south Florida.

“Can our democracy deliver on the most pressing needs of our people? Can our democracy overcome the lies, anger, hate and fears that have pulled us apart? America’s adversaries, the autocrats of the world, are betting we can’t,” Biden said. “But we have to prove them wrong. We have to prove democracy still works, that our government still works, and we can deliver for our people.” - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021


jpg Political Cartoon: Open Season

Political Cartoon: Open Season
by Dave Whamond©2021, Canada, PoliticalCartoons.com
Distributed to subscribers for publication for Cagle Cartoons, Inc.

jpg Political Cartoon: NATIONAL Rural Broadband

Political Cartoon: NATIONAL Rural Broadband
by R.J. Matson©2021, CQ Roll Call
Distributed to subscribers for publication for Cagle Cartoons, Inc.

jpg Political Cartoon: DC Statehood

Political Cartoon: DC Statehood
by Dick Wright©2021, PoliticalCartoons.com
Distributed to subscribers for publication for Cagle Cartoons, Inc.

jpg Political Cartoon: Joe "Robin Hood" Biden

Political Cartoon: Joe "Robin Hood" Biden
by John Darkow,©2021,Columbia Missourian
Distributed to subscribers for publication for Cagle Cartoons, Inc.

      

Real Time U.S. Debt Clock
http://www.usdebtclock.org/

U.S. debt
www.thenationaldebt.org

Real Time Alaska Debt Clock
US Debt Clock Alaska: click here

U.S. Inflation Calculator
Easily calculate the buying power of the US dollar & inflation rate from 1913-2020

U.S. Energy Info. Admin.
Heating Oil & Propane Update

Public Meetings & Info

Ketchikan Borough Assembly

arrowLive video stream of current meeting
arrow Meeting Video Archives
arrow Agenda and Information Packets
arrow Assembly Meeting Minutes

Ketchikan Planning Commission

arrowLive video stream of current meeting
arrowMeeting Video Archives
arrowAgenda, Information Packets & Minute

Ketchikan City Council

arrow Meeting Videos
arrow Agendas, Minutes & Information Packets
arrow E-COMMENT ON KETCHIKAN CITY COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS

Ketchikan School Board

arrow Live video stream of current meeting
arrow Agendas & Packets

Police Dispatch

arrow AK Troopers Daily Dispatch
arrow Ketchikan Police Reports
arrow Juneau Police Reports

Ketchikan

arrow Jobs
arrow AK Weathercams
arrow Current AK Weather Map

CLASSIFIEDS

arrowPublish

Publish Your Ad
Click Here

CLASSIFIEDS' CATEGORIES

arrow Public Meetings
arrow Announcements
arrow Upcoming Events
arrow Boats, etc.
arrow Help Wanted
arrow For Sale / Free Stuff
arrow Garage Sales
arrow Homes / Apts/ Property
arrow Pets
arrow Wanted
arrow Lost & Found
arrow Publish Your Ad


Front Page Archives
& Letter Archives
Feb. - May 2021
S M T W T F S
31 01 02 03 04 05 06
07 08 09 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 01 02 03 04 05 06
07 08 09 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 01 02 03
04 05 06 07 08 09 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 01
02 03 04        

Viewpoints, Analysis,
Op-Eds/Letters

Basic Rules &
Freedom of Speech

Questions, please contact the editor at editor@sitnews.us or call 617-9696

Sitnews reserves
the right to edit.


jpg Opinion

Ketchikan Borough Manager budgeted a $50,000 annual raise for himself By Dan Bockhorst - It's been brought to my attention that the Borough Manager has budgeted a $50,000 (40%) annual raise for himself beginning July 1. That level of increase for any Borough employee at any time is outrageous. It's especially so in the economic climate we currently find ourselves.

How do you think other Borough employees will feel if you grant such an increase? While increase for the Borough Attorney and Borough Clerk, and a 2% increase for the other 109 Borough employees.

You were elected to serve the citizens of Ketchikan. How do you think taxpayers and other local citizens will feel if you grant such an increase? You have a duty to be good stewards of the public treasury.

This matter was brought to my attention earlier today [Monday] by a Borough employee. Since then, 3 other employees contacted me – all expressing concern and disappointment. Of course, they're uneasy about voicing their distress to you directly. - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021

jpg Opinion

Fishing and Mariculture Update By Rep. Dan Ortiz - The fishing and mariculture industries - including fishing, processing, and management and hatcheries - produces $5.6 billion in economic output to Alaska’s economy and employs almost 60,000 workers each year. One of my main priorities as the District 36 representative is to protect and enhance our seafood industry.

I am sponsoring House Bill 41, which will allow qualified non-profits to pursue enhancement and restoration projects for shellfish species. It passed the House last week. If it passes the Senate, it will play an important role in the development of the mariculture industry.

I am a co-sponsor of House Bill 115, which simplifies the lease renewal process for aquatic farms. HB 115 has also passed the House, and if it passes the Senate, it will support the mariculture industry by reducing administrative overhead. - More...
Tuesday PM - May 04, 2021

jpg Opinion

APFC: Vision for Alaska's Financial Anchor By Angela Rodell - As we observe the anniversary of the creation of the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation (APFC) this month, it is noteworthy to laud the vision and leadership of the past, and imperative in my opinion to look forward - to bring that same extraordinary vision, leadership, and forethought to the now, the near, and the far. - More...
Tuesday PM - April 27, 2021

jpg Opinion

America deserves a pro-jobs climate plan By U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan - America stands at a strategic crossroads.

We could enact the Biden administration’s climate change policies that would shut down whole industries, provide pink slips to millions of American workers during a pandemic with no alternatives in the near term, drastically raise prices on American families, undermine economic growth, decrease energy reliability, diminish our national security and do little or nothing to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.- More...
Tuesday PM - April 27, 2021

jpg Opinion

NO, YOU DON’T NEED TO BE AN LLC, SO DON’T WASTE YOUR MONEY By David G Hanger, EA, MBA - This subject can be summarized this simply: In a closely-held business operation no business organizational form limits personal liability. Don’t care what you hear otherwise, that is the fact. The only thing that limits your personal liability is insurance; that is why they continue in business. Their business is liability protection. Please note, I do not sell insurance, I sell business organizational write-up. It just happens to be my personal standard that I do not sell junk. Many do.. - More...
Tuesday PM - April 27, 2021

jpg Opinion

Justice Amy Coney Barrett Second Amendment dilemma By William Heino Sr. - In some 229 years neither law professors, academic scholars, teachers, students or congressional legislators after much debate have not been able to satisfactorily explain or demonstrate the Framers intended purpose of Second Amendment of the Constitution. I had taken up that challenge allowing  Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s dilemma to understand the true intent of the Second Amendment.) - More...
Tuesday PM - April 27, 2021

Email letters, opinions, OPEDs to editor@sitnews.us



E-mail your news tips, news
releases & photos to:
editor@sitnews.us

SitNews
Stories in the News
©1997 - 2019
Ketchikan, Alaska

In Memory of SitNews' editor
(1999-2006),
Richard (Dick) Kauffman

1932-2007

Mary Kauffman, Webmaster/Editor,
Publisher...
editor@sitnews.us
907 617 9696

 jpg Mary Kauffman, Editor

Locally owned & operated.

Created 1997
1997-2005 Non-commercial
Est. Commercial 2005-2021
©1997 - 2021

 Articles & photographs that appear in SitNews may be protected by copyright and may not be reprinted or redistributed without written permission from and payment of required fees to the proper sources.

E-mail your news & photos to editor@sitnews.us

Photographers choosing to submit photographs for publication to SitNews are in doing so, granting their permission for publication and for archiving. SitNews does not sell photographs. All requests for purchasing a photograph will be emailed to the photographer.

 

2021 Celebration of the Sea Art Walk - Ketchikan Area Arts & Humanities Council - Ketchikan, Alaska

Ketchikan Area Arts & Humanities Council - Wearable Art Show Film on Demand

Alpine Real Estate - Ketchikan, Alaska

Davies-Barry Insurance - Ketchikan, Alaska

Rendezvous Senior Day Services - Ketchikan, Alaska

First Bank - Ketchikan, Alaska

Ketchikan Museums - Ketchikan, Alaska

Lighthouse Service - Ketchikan, Alaska - PetroOne

Madison Lumber & Hardware - Ketchikan, Alaska (TrueValue)

Alaskan and Proud Markets - Grocery & Liquor Stores - Ketchikan, Alaska

Alaska Travelers - Ketchikan, Alaska - Asisting travelers with lodging in Ketchikan since 1999.

Ketchikan Humane Society

The Local Paper - Ketchikan, Alaska The Local Paper - Ketchikan, Alaska The Home Office - The Local Paper; Ketchikan, Alaska

The Local Paper is
available online.
Click here for this week's printed edition (PDF)

KRBD - Ketchikan FM Community Radio for Southern Southeast Alaska

POW Report - Prince of Wales Island News  & Events

Shop Local & Advertise Local with SitNews - Ketchikan, Alaska

Wind & Water Home Page Wind & Water Classes